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Connecting to Multiple Databases Using Hibernate

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In a recent project, I had a requirement of connecting to multiple databases using hibernate. As tapestry-hibernate module does not provide an out-of-box support, I thought of adding one. https://github.com/tawus/tapestry5

Now that the application is in production, I thought of writing a simple “How to”.

I have cloned the latest stable(5.3.2) tapestry project at

https://github.com/tawus/tapestry5

and have added multiple database support to it.

Single Database

It is almost fully compatible with the previous integration when using a single database except for a few things

1) HibernateConfigurer has changed

public interface HibernateConfigurer
{
   /**
    * Passed the configuration so as to make changes.
    */
   void configure(Configuration configuration);

   /**
    * Factory Id for which this configurer is meant for
    */
   Class<? extends Annotation> getMarker();

   /**
    * Entity package names
    * 
    * @return
    */
   String[] getPackageNames();
}

2) There is no HibernateEntityPackageManager, as the packages can be contributed by adding more HibernateConfigurers with the same Markers.

Multiple databases

For multiple database, a marker has to be used for accessing Session or HibernateSessionManager

@Inject
@XDB
private Session session;

@Inject
@YDB
private HibernateSessionManager sessionManager;

@XDB
@CommitAfter
void myMethod(){

}

Also you have to define a HibernateSessionManager and a Session for the secondary database in the Module class.

@Scope(ScopeConstants.PERTHREAD)
@Marker(DatabaseTwo.class)
public static HibernateSessionManager buildHibernateSessionManagerForFinacle(
    HibernateSessionSource sessionSource,
    PerthreadManager perthreadManager)
{
    HibernateSessionManagerImpl service = new HibernateSessionManagerImpl(sessionSource,
        DatabaseTwo.class);

    perthreadManager.addThreadCleanupListener(service);

    return service;
}

@Marker(DatabaseTwo.class)
public static Session buildSessionForFinacle(
    @Local HibernateSessionManager
        sessionManager,
    PropertyShadowBuilder propertyShadowBuilder)
{
    return propertyShadowBuilder.build(sessionManager, "session", Session.class);
}

Notice an annotation @DatabaseTwo.class. This is a Factory marker and is used to identify a service related to a particular SessionFactory.

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target( {ElementType.FIELD, ElementType.PARAMETER, ElementType.METHOD})
@FactoryMarker
@Documented
public @interface DatabaseTwo
{

}

A typical AppModule for two databases will be

public class AppModule
{

    public static void bind(ServiceBinder binder)
    {
        binder.bind(DemoService.class, DemoServiceImpl.class);
    }

    @Contribute(HibernateSessionSource.class)
    public static void configureHibernateSources(OrderedConfiguration<HibernateConfigurer>
        configurers)
    {
        configurers.add("databaseOne", new HibernateConfigurer()
        {
            public void configure(org.hibernate.cfg.Configuration configuration)
            {
                configuration.configure("/databaseOne.xml");
            }

            public Class<? extends Annotation> getMarker()
            {
                return DefaultFactory.class;
            }

            public String[] getPackageNames()
            {
                return new String[] {"org.example.demo.one"};
            }
        });

        configurers.add("databaseTwo", new HibernateConfigurer()
        {
            public void configure(org.hibernate.cfg.Configuration configuration)
            {
                configuration.configure("/databaseTwo.xml");
            }

            public Class<? extends Annotation> getMarker()
            {
                return DatabaseTwo.class;
            }

            public String[] getPackageNames()
            {
                return new String[] {"org.example.demo.two"};
            }
        });
    }

    @Contribute(SymbolProvider.class)
    @ApplicationDefaults
    public static void addSymbols(MappedConfiguration<String, String> configuration)
    {
        configuration.add(HibernateSymbols.DEFAULT_CONFIGURATION, "false");
        configuration.add("tapestry.app-package", "org.example.demo");
    }


    @Scope(ScopeConstants.PERTHREAD)
    @Marker(DatabaseTwo.class)
    public static HibernateSessionManager buildHibernateSessionManagerForFinacle(
        HibernateSessionSource sessionSource,
        PerthreadManager perthreadManager)
    {
        HibernateSessionManagerImpl service = new HibernateSessionManagerImpl(sessionSource,
            DatabaseTwo.class);

        perthreadManager.addThreadCleanupListener(service);

        return service;
    }

    @Marker(DatabaseTwo.class)
    public static Session buildSessionForFinacle(
        @Local HibernateSessionManager
            sessionManager,
        PropertyShadowBuilder propertyShadowBuilder)
    {
        return propertyShadowBuilder.build(sessionManager, "session", Session.class);
    }

}

Injecting into Services

You can inject a session in a service using the marker. As DatabaseOne is being used as the default configuration, in order to inject its Session, you have to annotate it with @DefaultFactory. For DatabaseTwo, you can use @DatabaseTwo annotation.

public class DemoServiceImpl implements DemoService
{
    private Session sessionOne;

    private Session sessionTwo;

    public DemoServiceImpl(
        @DefaultFactory Session sessionOne,
        @DatabaseTwo Session sessionTwo)
    {
        this.sessionOne = sessionOne;
        this.sessionTwo = sessionTwo;
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public List<EntityOne> listOnes()
    {
        return sessionOne.createCriteria(EntityOne.class).list();
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public List<EntityTwo> listTwos()
    {
        return sessionTwo.createCriteria(EntityTwo.class).list();
    }

    public void save(EntityOne entityOne)
    {
        sessionOne.saveOrUpdate(entityOne);
    }

    public void save(EntityTwo entityTwo)
    {
        sessionTwo.saveOrUpdate(entityTwo);
    }
}


Using @CommitAfter

You can add an advice the same way you used to. The only change is in @CommitAfter. You have to additionally annotate the method with the respective marker.

public interface DemoService
{
    List<EntityOne> listOnes();

    List<EntityTwo> listTwos();

    @CommitAfter
    @DefaultFactory
    void save(EntityOne entityOne);

    @CommitAfter
    @DatabaseTwo
    void save(EntityTwo entityTwo);
}

Here is an example.

 

From http://tawus.wordpress.com/2012/03/03/tapestry-hibernate-multiple-databases/

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