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Refcard #301

Monitoring Kubernetes

This Refcard outlines common challenges in monitoring Kubernetes, details the core components of the monitoring tool Prometheus, and explains how to use Prometheus and Sensu together to monitor your infrastructure.

2,836

Brought to you by

Sensu
Free .PDF for easy Reference

Written by

Stefan Thorpe CTO / VP Engineering, Caylent / Cherre - We are hiring
Refcard #301

Monitoring Kubernetes

This Refcard outlines common challenges in monitoring Kubernetes, details the core components of the monitoring tool Prometheus, and explains how to use Prometheus and Sensu together to monitor your infrastructure.

2,836
Free .PDF for easy Reference

Written by

Stefan Thorpe CTO / VP Engineering, Caylent / Cherre - We are hiring

Brought to you by

Sensu
Table of Contents

Kubernetes: A Brief Overview

Section 1

Kubernetes: A Brief Overview

Kubernetes allows you to deploy and manage cloud-native applications with more flexibility than any container orchestration platform has ever provided before. Kubernetes, affectionately referred to as Kube or K8s for short, is an open-source platform for developers that eliminates many of the manual processes involved in managing, deploying, and scaling containerized applications.

The fault-tolerant and scalable platform can be deployed within almost any infrastructure. Kubernetes will integrate with anything, from public clouds (Google Cloud, Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services, and so on) to private or hybrid clouds to server clusters, data centers, or on-premises — or, indeed, any combination of these solutions. The remarkable fact that Kubernetes supports the automatic placement and replication of containers over such a large number of hosts is no doubt one of the many reasons why the platform is becoming the de-facto stage for running microservices infrastructure in the cloud.

THE KUBERNETES ORIGIN STORY

Kubernetes was initially conceived and developed by the engineers at Google. Open-sourced since its launch in mid-2014, K8s is now maintained, upgraded, and managed by a large community of contributors that includes so ware titans like Microsoft, Red Hat, IBM, and Docker.

As well as being publicly open about how the company's entire infrastructure runs in containers, Google was an early contributor to Linux container technology (the tech that powers all of Google's extensive cloud services). Kubernetes originally came into being through the cloud platform's 15 years of experience running production workloads, and is designed to handle tens, thousands, and even millions of containers. Google itself initiates more than 2 billion container deployments weekly. At one point, it ran everything through its internally developed platform: Borg.

Borg was a large-scale internal cluster management system and Kubernetes' predecessor. The internal program ran hundreds of thousands of jobs from a multitude of di erent applications across countless clusters, each with a vast number of machines. Much of the education garnered over the years from developing Borg was distilled into the Kubernetes technology we see today.

Alongside the release of Kubernetes v1.0 in July 2015, Google partnered with the Linux Foundation to establish the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). The CNCF's purpose is to build sustainable ecosystems while fostering a community around a network of high-quality projects that orchestrate containers within either a monolithic or a microservices architecture. Kubernetes is one of the highest velocity CNCF projects in the history of open source.

This is a preview of the Monitoring Kubernetes Refcard. To read the entire Refcard, please download the PDF from the link above.

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